Abbreviations for ID Plates


Here are some ways to abbreviate conditions and meds so first responders know what to do and what not to. More abbreviations
 
CKD AND HTN
ON ACE-INHIBITOR
 
KIDNEY FAILURE
DIABETES 2: ON INSULIN
 
KIDNEY FUNC. 55%
ON H DIALYSIS
 
ESRD (end-stage renal disease)
L-ARM: FISTULA
 
ARF (acute renal failure), 
HIGH RISK CVD
 
CKD – STAGE 3
ANEMIA W/SYNCOPE
 
Include other conditions to CKD along with critical meds so emergency responders treat the correct problem—especially if you're unconscious or unable to speak.
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Don't forget other medical issues such as heart problems, diabetes and critical meds. Doctors need a full picture to avoid drug interactions and to give proper aid.
Do not let kidney disease stop you from living your life by not being prepared. Having a medical ID bracelet could save you when every second counts.
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Why stainless steel is often better for kidney patients

Many metals can tarnish: including gold, silver, platinum, rhodium, pewter and more due to kidney meds. That's why we recommend stainless steel for kidney and any other organ transplant patient. If you are unsure, it's better to be safe than sorry. 
Chemicals leeching through the skin in Kidney Patients can etch and pit most metals. This is often due to the anti-rejection meds and other medications that transplant patients usually receive.
Not limited to transplants as some kidney patients may also be taking chemo meds for certain kidney problems.
Acidic skin, caused naturally in some people, can also tarnish and etch pewter, precious metals and many more.

See other design solutions at Medical ID Fashions

We can guide kidney patients to alternative solutions that include beaded bracelets without metal parts which have colorful glass, ceramics and precious stones. We also have solutions in attractive stainless steel beading. Custom solutions are also available.

Kidney Disease Medical ID Bracelets
Billboard: Wanted Kidney Donor. Caption: Why Myrna wears a lifesaving medical ID bracelet.

Our customer protects her precious kidney 24/7

Myrna Bernstein put her kidney condition up for display: right next to Central Ave in Albany, New York. Her story will inspire you to pursue every possible avenue to get the treatment you need and protect yourself with a medical bracelet. Read more here.
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Why kidney disease needs a medical ID bracelet

Any level of kidney disease is a concern to paramedics and doctors. That's why when you're unconscious, they need to know about your specific preexisting conditions to give you the right emergency treatment. After all, every second counts.
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Chronic kidney disease, acute renal failure and end-stage renal disease, are all conditions that require special attention in case of an emergency. Each classification of kidney disease has its own set of complications, and they all can result in life-threatening consequences. 
Fluid retention. Without the kidneys to properly rid of waste in the blood, the toxins back up and cause swelling in the extremities. This could direct fluid into your lungs or the cardiac sac (pericardium) resulting in obstructions of the airways and blood flow to the heart which can be deadly if not treated promptly. 
Hyperkalemia. Put simply, hyperkalemia is having too much potassium in the bloodstream. This is more common in CKD patients than what is considered normal because of the problems with filtration of the blood. If this comes on suddenly, the spike in potassium can impair the heart’s ability to function.
Cardiac episode. It's common for people that have CKD to also have high blood pressure, hold excess weight, and/or have damaged blood vessels. Each of these factors combined puts one at a higher risk for a cardiac episode such as a stroke, heart failure, or a heart attack. 
(Mayo Clinic Staff, 2015)

Need more help: See The American Association of Kidney Patients

The AAKP is a specialized organization that has many resources to improve the quality of life for kidney patients. Join today—the Membership is Free! Buy medical bracelets through the AAKP Store and 10% goes to a great cause.

Chronic kidney disease and its impact on your body

Chronic kidney disease (CKD), or chronic kidney failure, is the end result of a gradual loss of kidney function usually having spanned several years or decades. Symptoms do not usually manifest until the later stages of the disease—often at the point where the kidneys are damaged beyond repair. 
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Healthy kidney function makes possible the filtration of wastes and excess fluids from the bloodstream. When kidney function is compromised, these toxins will begin to build up causing a host of problems such as:
• Nausea, vomiting, loss of appetite, fatigue/weakness
• Noticeable differences in the amounts of urination
• Muscle twitches and cramps, swelling of feet and ankles, itching
• Chest pain & shortness of breath related to fluid buildup in the chest cavity 
(Mayo Clinic Staff, 2015)

Symptoms of CKD often vary from person-to-person with no regular set of side-effects although, there are several factors that put one at an increased risk of developing CKD. It is important to make an appointment with your doctor if you are experiencing the aforementioned symptoms and if any of these factors apply to you:
• Diabetes (DM)- 44% of new CKD cases have diabetes listed as the primary cause. 
• High blood pressure (HTN)- Every one in five adults with HTN have or will have CKD. 
• Older adult- The chance of having CKD increase with age, and is most common among individuals aged 70 years or older.
• African-American- It is unclear as to why, but African Americans are three and a half times more likely to develop CKD than white Americans. (CDC, 2014)  
Treatment for CKD focuses on alleviating symptoms (e.g. diuretics for swelling), controlling conditions that compound kidney failure (e.g. ACE inhibitors for HTN), and/or hopefully replacing the damaged organ(s) through transplant or dialysis. The course of action taken is completely dependent on both what stage of progression CKD is in, as well as the desires of the individual. Unfortunately, there currently is no cure for CKD no matter what stage they are experiencing, and unless a transplant occurs it is likely that the disease will result in death especially if not properly monitored by a physician. 
 

References:

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). National Chronic Kidney Disease Fact Sheet: General Information and National Estimates on Chronic Kidney Disease in the United States, 2014. Atlanta, GA: US Department of Health and Human Services, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention; 2014.
 
Mayo Clinic Staff. (2015, January). Chonic kidney disease. Retrieved May 2016